Frequently Asked Questions

Our professional, knowledgeable staff can discuss the benefits, risks, and side effects of laser surgery. Our ultimate goal is that you have all the information you need to make an informed decision.

 

  1. Am I a good candidate for laser vision correction?

    We recommend you come in for an evaluation. We will test your present glasses, check your present prescription, and help you decide which procedure will offer you the greatest benefit. The ideal laser vision correction candidate is at least 18 years or older, with a stable prescription that has not changed significantly within the past 12 months. Ideal candidates will also have generally healthy eyes. Although our results do surpass the national averages, we cannot guarantee perfect vision following the procedure. Patients with certain severe medical problems or eye disease may not be candidates.

  2. Are the results of laser surgery permanent?

    Laser vision correction is considered permanent. However, laser vision correction will not prevent the age-related problem of needing reading glasses.

  3. How long does laser surgery take?

    You will be in the office for about an hour for the LASIK procedure. The actual surgical time is only a few minutes. Following the procedure you will be asked to rest with your eyes closed for about 20 minutes in our office.

  4. Does laser surgery hurt?

    During the procedure itself, you will feel no pain. In fact, most people say that there is NO sensation at all. You will be given drops to numb your eyes, and encouraged to take a sedative to make you feel relaxed. Post operatively, most patients experience little or no discomfort with laser surgery.

  5. What kind of vision can I expect the day after surgery?

    This will depend upon the type of procedure you choose. With LASIK, many patients notice improved vision immediately after the procedure. Most patients are functional without their corrective lenses one day after the procedure. Patients continue to see a gradual increase in their visual acuity during the first five to seven days after the procedure.

  6. What about having both eyes done at the same time?

    This is a decision between you and your doctor. The exciting news is that because of the accuracy of laser vision correction, both eyes are most often treated at the same time. However, if you decide to do them one at a time, the second eye can usually be done anywhere from one day to a few months later.

  7. When will I be able to return to work?

    Depending upon the amount of correction, almost everyone can return to their normal activities one to three days after the procedure. Our education coordinator can give you more details during your examination.

  8. What is the difference between LASIK, PRK, RK and laser vision correction?

    RK was an early surgical procedure where the cornea was cut with a scalpel. With laser surgeries like LASIK and PRK, the cornea is reshaped by a cool, invisible beam of light. The laser is computer-controlled, and programmed specifically for your individual prescription. It automatically corrects nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. For more detail, see our Vision Correction Surgery section.

  9. Is laser vision correction covered by insurance?

    Probably not. Insurance companies consider laser vision correction elective, thus it is not usually a covered benefit. However, a few employers and some unions do cover it. Please check with your insurance company.

  10. Do you have financing plans?

    We offer 0% interest for 12 months. We also have payment options that include financing for up to 5 years, with payments as low as $74 per month. Financing based on approved credit. See our Affordability, Insurance & Financing section.

  11. What are the risks of laser vision correction?

    Our education coordinator will cover the potential risks of any eye surgery with you. They include:

    – Infection: Usually able to be treated with antibiotics, national averages are less than 1 out of 3,000.
    – Haze: Originates from the healing process in the eye. It is almost never seen with LASIK. Is almost always gone at the end of 6 months. Is rarely visually significant. Can be re-treated by the laser.
    – Under or over correction: Because eyes all heal at different rates, this is the most common (and correctable) complication. We can re-treat the eye anywhere from 3 months to 12 months after the surgery

  12. Risks associated with LASIK only:

    – Because LASIK involves making a thin flap and applying the laser under the flap, there could be complications.
    – There is a small risk that the epithelium (the skin that covers the eye) can grow under the flap. This is almost always treatable without any additional laser surgery.